WEDNESDAY 8 OCTOBER 2014

WEDNESDAY 8 OCTOBER 2014 7.30pm Cadogan Hall

WEDNESDAY 8 OCTOBER 2014
Kilar
Orawa
Chopin
Piano Concerto No.1
Dvořák
Symphony No.8
Ingolf Wunder
piano
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor

The LCO launches its 2014/15 season with Chopin’s evergreen First Piano Concerto. And who better to perform it than the young Austrian pianist Ingolf Wunder (making his UK concerto debut), who carried off the coveted Concerto Prize at the 2010 International Chopin Competition with this very work. The concert opens with Orawa – a lively folk-influenced work by another Polish composer, Wojciech Kilar, best known for film scores such as The Pianist and Dracula. Completing the programme is Dvořák’s joyful Eighth Symphony, which revels in the folk tunes of the composer’s Bohemian homeland.

WEDNESDAY 3 DECEMBER 2014

WEDNESDAY 3 DECEMBER 2014 7.30pm Cadogan Hall

WEDNESDAY 3 DECEMBER 2014
Sibelius
Rakastava
Elgar
Cello Concerto
Shostakovich
Two Pieces for String Octet
Shostakovich
Chamber Symphony Op.110a
Alexey Stadler
cello
Vladimir Ashkenazy
conductor

At the heart of Ashkenazy’s passionate programme lies Elgar’s searing Cello Concerto; written in the aftermath of the First World War, it’s a potent elegy for a lost age. Making his UK concerto debut is the astounding Russian cellist Alexey Stadler.

Like Shostakovich, Ashkenazy experienced life as an artist in the Soviet Union. Shostakovich’s Chamber Symphony is an orchestration of his intense Eighth Quartet, written at white heat and dedicated to ‘the victims of fascism and war’.

Sibelius’s Rakastava (The Lover) is a real rarity but no less compelling for all that, abounding in atmosphere.

THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2015

THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2015 7.30pm Cadogan Hall

THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2015
Mozart
Concert Rondo, K.386a
Beethoven
Piano Concerto No.4b
Beethoven
Symphony No.7
Ashot Khachatourian
pianoa
Maria João Pires
pianob
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor

The iconic Maria João Pires returns to the LCO with one of her favourite concertos – Beethoven’s Fourth.

An ardent nurturer of young talent, Pires has recently launched the Partitura Project – bringing together artists of different generations. As part of the project’s inaugural season, the Armenian Ashot Khachatourian plays Mozart’s carefree Concert Rondo, K.386.

Beethoven knew his Seventh Symphony was special – even by his standards! So did Wagner when he described its irrepressible last movement as the “apotheosis of the dance”.

Concert supported by The David and Claudia Harding Foundation

Untitled

Initiated by Maria João Pires, the aim of the Partitura Project is to create an altruistic dynamic between artists of different generations and to offer an alternative in a world too often focused on competitiveness. Read more here: http://musicchapel.org/partitura-2/

WEDNESDAY 4 FEBRUARY 2015

WEDNESDAY 4 FEBRUARY 2015 7.30pm Cadogan Hall

WEDNESDAY 4 FEBRUARY 2015
Widmann
Ikarische Klage
Mozart
Clarinet Concerto
Mozart
Symphony No.41 “Jupiter”
Jörg Widmann
clarinet/conductor

One of the world’s great musical multi-taskers, the charismatic Jörg Widmann is renowned as a composer, clarinet soloist and conductor. He takes on all three roles in this concert, which features music by another multi-talented musician, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

We open with Widmann conducting the London premiere of his Ikarische Klage – Icarus’s Lament – the ultimate cautionary tale of ambition outstripping ability.

Widmann then turns soloist in Mozart’s sublime Clarinet Concerto, and ends the evening conducting the LCO in Mozart’s ebulliently life- affirming final symphony, the “Jupiter”.

FRIDAY 15 MAY 2015

FRIDAY 15 MAY 2015 7PM Cadogan Hall

FRIDAY 15 MAY 2015
Butterworth
The Banks of Green Willow
Coles
Cortège (from Behind the Lines)
Kelly
Elegy for Strings
Chapman
But where do we get the water?
Sibelius
Symphony No.5
Music Junction Participants
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor

Had the First World War never happened, how different the 20th century musical landscape would have looked. Composers George Butterworth, Cecil Coles and Frederick Septimus Kelly were all killed in action on the battlefields of the Somme. Tonight they’re reunited, with a work by each of them presented as a single, three-movement symphony. Complementing this is the world premiere of a new commission by Duncan Chapman, performed by the LCO and Music Junction Participants, based on the theme of ‘transformation’.

As the battles were raging on the Somme, the Finn Jean Sibelius was struggling with his own demons – alcoholism and depression – while working on his glorious Fifth Symphony, a piece that threw away the rulebook and marked a new beginning in musical history.

Concert supported by MariaMarina Foundation

THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 2015

THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 2015 5.45 PM

THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER 2015 Book
Queen Mary University of London
Some Things Rich and Strange

This multi-dimensional event brings together members of the London Chamber Orchestra and Queen Mary University of London’s Centre for Digital Music, one of the leading music research centres of its kind in the world.

The audience can choose to explore between Arno Babajanian’s romantically pulsating piano trio of 1952, a talk and/or related film.  In the second half the audiences come together to hear members of the London Chamber Orchestra with pianist Karim Said in romantic works of Twentieth Century Vienna. The concert ends with Schoenberg’s dramatic portrayal of Napoleon Bonaparte using Byron’s text.
More details to follow.

Booking will open in September. 

Part of Inside Out Festival: http://www.insideoutfestival.org.uk/2015/

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WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 FREE EARLY CONCERT

WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 FREE EARLY CONCERT 7pm

WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 FREE EARLY CONCERT Book
Schoenberg
Ode To Napoleon
Karim Said
Piano
Mark Stone
Narrator
LCO String Quartet

Schoenberg’s Ode is nothing less than a personal stand against tyranny. It sets a poem written by Lord Byron in 1814, just days after hearing that Napoleon had surrendered his empire gone into exile on the island of Elba. Just as Byron had supported Greece’s struggle for independence, so Schoenberg, exiled in America during the Second World War, wanted to show his allegiance with Europe’s struggles against Hitler.

This is a free, ticketed concert prior to the main LCO concert at 8pm.

WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL

WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL 8PM

WEDNESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL Book
Beethoven
Piano Concerto No.5, 'Emperor'
Beethoven
Symphony No.5
Yevgeny Sudbin
piano
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor

Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony was written during the bombardment and later occupation of Vienna by Napoleon’s troops; its iconic opening theme representing “fate knocking at the door”. The Fifth Piano Concerto’s nickname of ‘Emperor’ wasn’t Beethoven’s own, yet it quickly caught on, thanks to the work’s heroic and lofty writing. Performing the concerto is Yevgeny Sudbin, hailed by The Telegraph as “one of the greatest pianists of the 21st century”.

HONG KONG TOUR MUSICUS FEST 25-29 NOVEMBER

HONG KONG TOUR MUSICUS FEST 25-29 NOVEMBER 8PM

HONG KONG TOUR MUSICUS FEST 25-29 NOVEMBER Book

In late November, LCO embark on a four day tour of Hong Kong, as part of Musicus Society’s Musicus Fest 2015. Christopher Warren-Green and LCO musicians are joined by Musicus Artistic Director and acclaimed cellist, Trey Lee, in a programme that sees both concert performances and education work. The festival culminates in a final concert performance on the 29th November, with two double concertos in one afternoon: Vivaldi’s Double Cello Concerto, featuring Trey Lee and Elena Cheah, and Mendelssohn’s Concerto for Violin and Piano by Dong-Suk Kang and Colleen Lee. The programme concludes with a Mozart masterpiece – the much-loved Symphony No. 41, Jupiter.

SUNDAY 6 DECEMBER 2015 SAFFRON HALL

SUNDAY 6 DECEMBER 2015 SAFFRON HALL 3:00pm

SUNDAY 6 DECEMBER 2015 SAFFRON HALL Book
Corelli
Concerto grosso Op.6 No.8, ‘Christmas Concerto’
Tartini
Trumpet Concerto D53
Bach
Orchestral Suite No.3
Geminiani
Concerto grosso No.12 after Corelli ‘La folia’
Albinoni
Oboe Concerto Op.7 No.3 (arr. for trumpet)
Vivaldi
Concerto for Three Violins (arr. for trumpets)
Handel
Overture to The Occasional Oratorio
Alison Balsom
Trumpet / Director

We’re delighted to announce that LCO’s concert with Alison Balsom will be also performed as part of Saffron Hall’s 2015-16 Season.

Possessing an extraordinarily brilliant technique, a luminous stage presence, and deeply-felt musicality, Alison Balsom has done more than anyone in recent years to demonstrate the trumpet’s popularity as a solo instrument. In this concert Balsom (Gramophone Artist of the Year 2013) explores the grandeur of baroque music. In addition to a work originally written for trumpet by Tartini, she includes arrangements of two lively and popular concertos by Albinoni and Vivaldi. She is accompanied by a superb orchestra with which she has a particularly warm and close relationship.

WEDNESDAY 9 DECEMBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL

WEDNESDAY 9 DECEMBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL 7.30pm

WEDNESDAY 9 DECEMBER 2015 CADOGAN HALL Book
Corelli
Concerto grosso Op.6 No.8, ‘Christmas Concerto’
Tartini
Trumpet Concerto D53
Bach
Orchestral Suite No.3
Geminiani
Concerto grosso No.12 after Corelli ‘La folia’
Albinoni
Oboe Concerto Op.7 No.3 (arr. for trumpet)
Vivaldi
Concerto for Three Violins (arr. for trumpets)
Handel
Overture to The Occasional Oratorio
Alison Balsom
trumpet/director

Alison Balsom is one of those artists who transcends musical boundaries. She also has a keen appetite for exploration and, though the repertoire for the trumpet is not exactly lavish, that certainly doesn’t hold her back. In her inimitable way she has begged, borrowed and stolen music for tonight’s concert, in which she plays and directs, including a vibrant oboe concerto by Albinoni and a triple violin concerto by that irrepressible master of the genre, Vivaldi. And who worries about a little light-fingered behaviour when the results are so scintillating? This concert looks set to be the ultimate winter warmer.

WEDNESDAY 2 MARCH 2016 CADOGAN HALL

WEDNESDAY 2 MARCH 2016 CADOGAN HALL 7.30pm

WEDNESDAY 2 MARCH 2016 CADOGAN HALL Book
Cherubini
Overture to ‘Médée’
Beethoven
Violin Concerto
Mendelssohn
Symphony No.4, ‘Italian’
Benjamin Beilman
violin
Riccardo Minasi
conductor

Cherubini and Napoleon crossed paths in Vienna in 1805: the composer had gone there on a visit (meeting Beethoven, who was a great admirer), whereas Napoleon occupied it. In the Overture to ‘Médée’ Cherubini vividly sets the scene for the tragic and bloody tale of Medea. Beethoven wrote his sole Violin Concerto the following year. Initially met with incomprehension, it was revived after Beethoven’s death by a certain Felix Mendelssohn. Mendelssohn described his ‘Italian’ Symphony as “the jolliest piece I have ever done” – not a bad summation for a work that seems to have absorbed the light and energy of a country that bewitched the composer. Making their LCO debut are the gifted American violinist Benjamin Beilman, who was last year a recipient of the prestigious Borletti-Buitoni trust fellowship, and the Italian Riccardo Minasi – himself an accomplished violinist as well as a specialist in period performance.

WEDNESDAY 6 APRIL 2016 CADOGAN HALL

WEDNESDAY 6 APRIL 2016 CADOGAN HALL 7.30pm

WEDNESDAY 6 APRIL 2016 CADOGAN HALL Book
Haydn
Symphony No.85, ‘La Reine’
Mozart
Arias from ‘Don Giovanni’, 'The Magic Flute' and ‘The Marriage of Figaro’
Beethoven
Symphony No.3, ‘Eroica’
Lucy Crowe
soprano
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor
(Free pre-concert Q&A at 6.30pm)

Napoleon was a regular opera-goer and an admirer of Italian vocal music in particular. He was impressed by Mozart’s Don Giovanni, and famously described The Marriage of Figaro as “the Revolution in action”. Beethoven was vehemently opposed to repression of any kind. He initially dedicated his Third Symphony to Napoleon, whom he saw as a great hero and an upholder of democracy. But when he heard that Napoleon had declared himself Emperor, he angrily scratched out the dedication. The concert opens with ‘La Reine’, one of Haydn’s Paris Symphonies and a favourite of the ill-fated Marie Antoinette.

All ticket holders are invited to join a free Q&A at 18:30 in the main hall with LCO Music Director Christopher Warren-Green, composer Cheryl Frances-Hoad and LCO Education and Outreach Artistic Director Rosemary Warren-Green, ahead of the world premiere of “I Am You, Brave and Strong” at Cadogan Hall that LCO will perform next month on the 6th May. Please note there is no reserved seating for this event.

FRIDAY 6 MAY 2016 CADOGAN HALL

FRIDAY 6 MAY 2016 CADOGAN HALL 7pm

FRIDAY 6 MAY 2016 CADOGAN HALL Book
Catel
Overture to ‘Sémiramis’
Haydn
Symphony No.100, ‘Military’
Cheryl Frances-Hoad
I Am You, Brave and Strong (new commission)
Beethoven
Egmont Overture
Christopher Warren-Green
conductor

The final concert of the season features a world premiere in which LCO is joined by participants from Music Junction, the orchestra’s groundbreaking community and outreach programme. Beethoven’s Overture was written for a play by Goethe commemorating the heroic deeds of Count Egmont in his struggle against tyranny; and it’s easy to hear how Haydn’s ‘Military’ Symphony got its nickname, its second movement evoking, according to one reviewer, “the hellish roar of war”. We begin with a real rarity – an overture by Beethoven’s contemporary, Charles-Simon Catel, a popular figure in his time and the go-to composer when rousing military music was needed for state ceremonies.

Thursday 20 October 2016

Thursday 20 October 2016 8pm

Thursday 20 October 2016
Mendelssohn
Piano Concerto No.1
Walton
Henry V (arr. Christopher Palmer)
Bertrand Chamayou
Piano
Simon Harrison
Narrator
The Choir of Royal Holloway
Choristers of New College Oxford
Christopher Warren-Green
Conductor

Free early concert at 7pm in the Main Hall: LCO soloists perform excerpts from Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream arranged for string quartet.

“Chamayou’s musically insightful, technically flawless playing can be confused with no-one else’s.” International Record Review, May 2014

What links Mendelssohn and Walton? A love of Shakespeare, whose 400th anniversary falls in 2016. Mendelssohn’s enthusiasm found voice with his overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream, written when he was just 16. As a mature composer he returned to the play and added further numbers that recapture his youthful style with uncanny ease.

Similarly bucolic – and demanding the utmost dexterity from pianists – is Mendelssohn’s First Piano Concerto, which channels the spirit of Mozart to entirely personal effect. Walton’s music for Henry V perfectly complements Laurence Olivier’s 1944 film, but it was Christopher Palmer who developed an extended version that melds music and dialogue, bringing the drama fully alive.

Tickets: £40, £30, £20, £10

Book here

Thursday 26 January 2017

Thursday 26 January 2017 7.30pm

Thursday 26 January 2017
Haydn
Cello Concerto No.1
Haydn
Symphony No.45, “Farewell”
Beethoven
Symphony No.8
Trey Lee
Cello
Christopher Warren-Green
Conductor

Haydn famously claimed that he was so cut off by his long tenure at the Esterházy family’s estate in rural Hungary that he was ‘forced to become original’. The ‘Farewell’ Symphony was the composer’s subtle plea to his employer to let the orchestra return home to their families, and perhaps it was the sheer quality of the music that persuaded the Prince to release his orchestra. We find Haydn in far more upbeat mood in the First Cello Concerto.

Unlike Haydn, Beethoven never tied himself to a single patron. His Eighth Symphony is one of his most delightful works, one that the great writer and polemicist George Bernard Shaw dared to declare ‘better than the Seventh’.

Tickets: £40, £30, £20, £10

Book here

Tuesday 21 February 2017

Tuesday 21 February 2017 7.30pm

Tuesday 21 February 2017
Beethoven
Kakadu Variations (for Piano Trio)
Beethoven
Triple Concerto
Beethoven
Symphony No.4
Luise Buchberger
Cello
Kristian Bezuidenhout
Piano
Lorenza Borrani
Violin/Director

From early in his career, Beethoven made the piano trio very much his own. The youthful ‘Kakadu’ variations show his genius for taking a banal melody and sending it up with a sequence of brilliant variations.

Beethoven took things a stage further when he set a piano trio against an orchestra in his Triple Concerto. Written a couple of years later, Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony finds him at his most delectably Haydnesque.

Tickets: £40, £30, £20, £10

Book here

Friday 5 May 2017

Friday 5 May 2017 7pm

Friday 5 May 2017
Adams
Shaker Loops
Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No.1
Copland
Appalachian Spring
Paul Edlin
Simple Gifts (World Premiere)
Daniil Kharitonov
Piano
Lucienne Renaudin-Vary
Trumpet
Music Junction Participants
Christopher Warren-Green
Conductor

Concert supported by MariaMarina Foundation

The Shaker movement, with its ethos of hard work combined with an ecstatic form of worship, inspired John Adams’ early minimalist masterpiece Shaker Loops. And Copland uses the famous Shaker hymn ‘Simple Gifts’ in Appalachian Spring, his wartime ballet which heralded a new simplicity and directness of style.

 ‘Simple Gifts’ also forms the starting point for Paul Edlin’s new work, which will be performed by the young participants of the Music Junction scheme. The soloists in Shostakovich’s outlandishly ebullient First Piano Concerto are also strikingly youthful: the hugely gifted teenagers Daniel Karitonov and Lucienne Renaudin-Vary.

Tickets: £40, £30, £20, £10

Book here

Wednesday 14 June 2017

Wednesday 14 June 2017 7.30pm

Wednesday 14 June 2017
Elgar
Introduction and Allegro
Sibelius
Violin Concerto
Sibelius
The Bard
Elgar
Enigma Variations
Pekka Kuusisto
Violin
Vladimir Ashkenazy
Conductor

Concert supported by The David and Claudia Harding Foundation

“The Sibelius Violin Concerto is often played, but never quite like this! Kuusisto launched into the music with a straightforward intensity that had listeners leaning forward in their seats.” – Seattle Times, March 2015

Sibelius and Elgar both derived inspiration from their immediate surroundings. Sibelius’s Violin Concerto is imbued with the craggy landscapes of his beloved Finland, while Elgar quotes a Welsh song he’d heard on holiday within his Introduction and Allegro, in which a string quartet is pitted against a string orchestra.

The Bard is the briefest and most perhaps most elusive of Sibelius’s tone-poems, relying on the prominent use of a harp to suggest ancient story-telling. Elgar’s Enigma Variations is rather more specific, nothing less than a series of character sketches depicting the composer’s friends.

Tickets: £40, £30, £20, £10

Book here

Tickets for LCO's 2016/17 season at Cadogan Hall are now available to book at £40, £30, £20 or £10 each. Cadogan Hall Box Office: 020 7730 4500 Book online cadoganhall.com/lco

   
Offers Book for 3–5 concerts and save 20%. Contact the LCO Box Office for young person ticket offers. LCO also offers a 20% discount on groups of sixteen or more.